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Eclectic art shown in EDH

By: Roger Phelps, The Telegraph
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A tradition of a gallery experience as a stretching of the brain or soul, literally on a “church porch,” informs Hang It Up in El Dorado Hills. Artists buy frames there, and collectors get Asian or European canvas finds stretched there after shipping, but proprietor Dave Williams likes the give and take of finding promising artists and they finding him. He exhibits around 175 canvases at a given time. “You have to be able to understand and explain why one work will sell for $500 and one for $1,500,” Williams said. Hang It Up’s intent is to be known for a range of works that crosses the spectrum of extant styles. At times, Williams will need to turn down a proffered work of a promising painter only because art he already hangs works in that style in the gallery in Town Center. Exhibited artists hail from as close as up the street to the United Kingdom. Williams has the pleasure of seeing artists develop. Painter Reif Erickson of Auburn just gets better at what he’s been doing, in a traditional style of pastel-rendered foothills nature scenes, Williams said. Erickson can charge accordingly. Interaction with painters around getting their works into Hang It Up takes various forms, Williams said. Some painters are aggressive and some are painfully passive, he said. “Ross Eccles is the kind of guy who would put four or five canvases under his arm and start knocking on doors,” Williams said, referring to a painter well-known in his native United Kingdom, a virtual unknown here but on exhibit at Hang It Up. “Others, all they really want to do is sit in a corner and paint.” Williams said “a real interesting conversation” led him to exhibit Eccles, one of only two artists exhibited who are from outside the local region. Eccles, in a blog says, “believe that a lot of artists, by the nature of their occupation, have developed parts of the brain which ‘see the whole picture’ in much greater clarity than the general populace, who are schooled by a curriculum which concentrates on sequential detail. One of these days, enlightened businesses will seek the advice of artists and other creative thinkers in order to formulate better policies.” The shrinking and the shy are represented, too. “I’ll usually work with a friend of theirs in such cases,” Williams said.